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    How Will the First Session of the Constituent Assembly Be Held?

    By Farah Samti | Nov 18 2011 Share on Linkedin Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on pinterest Print

    Tags: Constitution , first session , ISIE

    After ISIE’s official announcement of the election’s final results on November 14th, Tunisia is now anticipating the first session of the National Constituent Assembly. This meeting will take place on Tuesday, November 22nd, in the former parliament’s building of Bardo, Tunis.

    The Tunisian Official Register, which was issued on November 15th, published order number 3576 after ISIE’s last announcement. This order was a call for all members of the Constituent Assembly to attend its first opening session.

    During this meeting, members of the Constituent Assembly plan to elect a president of the Constituent Assembly and two vice-presidents. Until these decisions are made, the session will be chaired by the oldest member, who will become the temporary president. The temporary president will lead the assembly with the assistance of the two youngest members, who will become the temporary vice presidents. The temporary president and vice presidents will be determined in the beginning of the first session.

    It is noteworthy to mention that the gender parity rule, which required at least half the names on each list for candidacy to be female, will also be maintained in the Constituent Assembly. It will be applied when choosing the temporary president and vice-presidents of the Assembly and when officially electing them.

    At the beginning of the session, once the temporary president of the Constituent Assembly is chosen, this temporary president will recite the names on the final list of the Assembly’s members. All members will then take an oath that reads “I swear to God to fulfill my duties in the Constituent Assembly with loyalty and independence in serving only Tunisia.” The text could be a subject to change, only if the members agree to change it.

    Electing the Constituent Assembly’s president should be secret and depend on the total majority rule. A second round might take place in case the majority did not reach an agreement about one candidate. Members who gained the most votes from the first round will run for the second round. The final results will bring the first session to an end.

    Once the first session is over, the future sessions will be chaired by the elected president and vice-presidents. Roles of the Constituent Assembly’s president include forming a committee to organize the internal system of the country, and reorganizing the temporary layout of public authorities.

  • By Farah Samti  / 
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      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live

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