• Headlines

    Tunisian Association Pushes to Criminalize Normalization with Israel

    By Asma Ghribi | Jan 29 2012 Share on Linkedin Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on pinterest Print

    Tags: Ahmed Kahlaoui , Hatem Dkhil , normalization with Israel , The national Committee for Supporting the Arab Resistance and Fighting Normalization and Zionism

    National Committee for Supporting Arab Resistance and Fighting Normalization and Zionism

    The National Committee for Supporting Arab Resistance and Fighting Normalization and Zionism, is a post-revolution Tunisian association whose mission is to lobby the National Constituent Assembly to criminalize normalization with the State of Israel.

    The association organized a rally on Sunday, January 29th at the Ibn Khaldoun Cultural Center in downtown Tunis. Almost 100 people attended.

    “We want our new constitution to include an article outlawing all types of normalization with the Zionist terrorist entity,” announced Ahmed Kahlaoui, President of the National Committee for Supporting the Arab Resistance and Fighting Normalization and Zionism.

    Kahlaoui expressed his discontent with Tunisian civil society for their disinterest in the Palestinian cause.

    He blames the lack of interest on what he calls foreign funding coming from “Zionist bodies” attempting to divert Tunisians from paying more attention to normalization.

    “But what can we expect from people receiving huge amounts of money from Zionist bodies disguised behind the masks of tolerance and democracy,” Kahlaoui declared.

    Hatem Dkhil, is a high school teacher and an anti-Israel advocate. He accused the Ben Ali regime of cultural normalization with Israel.

    “The previous regime tried to corrupt the minds of young people… the previous educational system glorified Zionist figures.”

    Dakhli also added that making a difference between Zionism and Judaism is “nothing but an illusion.”

    According to Dakhli, under the previous regime, school textbooks were designed by “Zionist teachers.”

    Dakhli was particularly upset with the maps in former regime textbooks. “In the maps of the Arab world, they either only mention Israel or recognize both Israel and Palestine,” he complained.

  • By Asma Ghribi  / 
  • Topics

    People

    Place

    Organization

    Related

    Comments

    1. Steve /

      What a nazi cesspool Tunisia is

      Fine then, you want to discriminate against Jews and Israel, so Americans, Canadians and most Europeans will try to discriminate against Tunisia.

      You idiots

    2. Shimon Z. Klein /

      When the Arab Spring began in Tunisia and heralded the Arab Spring across the Middle East, I was pleased and like most people hoped that true democracy, tolerance, justice and equality of all peoples in the Middle East. A new beginning would start and the suffering of the Arab people would come to an end. In this I include the Palestinian people who have also suffered because of Israeli occupation. I am an Israeli and a human activist for the rights of all peoples irrespective of race, colour or religion. We are all human beings and we must reach out to each other and work for the common good of all our peoples in the Middle East. Remember that in Israel there are a number of activists against the occupation and working for justice. Why boycott them? We are trying to change our society from within – boycotting us only serves their narrow cause of racism as well as perpetuating the occupation. My wife is of Tunisian Jewish origin and my children are a mix of Israel, Tunisia and South Africa. My feelings for the Tunisian people are deep and my dream would be to visit your wonderful country.Peace can move mountains and put an end to hate.

    3. Benevolent Insect Overlord /

      Why is a bad thing? Anything they can do, anything any country can do to accelerate their slide back into ignorance, violence bigotry and hatred isn’t an entirely bad thing for the rest of us. It’s a cold hard competitive world out there and for every country that embraces stupidity is one less country the rest of us actually has to contend with. For every fatwah and decree screaming for the blood of infidels is all those infidels to show them the back of their hands. For every call to travel backward into the Middle Ages is one less economic or geopolitical contender or opponent. With any luck they’ll declare literacy itself a crime and when they can no longer feed themselves and they’ve killed the last person who knew how to keep the lights on, I will cheer. We all will cheer.

    4. Afif /

      @ all who preceded my comment:
      Rest assured that the association is probably is made up of handful of people who do not represent the wishes and aspirations of all the Tunisian people. I wish the author of the article has some notes about the number of its members, and I am sure it would be laughable. I am very impressed with Mr. Klein’s comment, and I hope that he will bring the kids to Tunisia and let them enjoy the land of of original of their mother. Yes, indeed, “We are all human beings and we must reach out to each other and work for the common good of all our peoples in the Middle East,” and all over the world.
      I hope Steve’s reaction will be toned down once he realizes that most Tunisians are very open to the world and to different cultures. He is welcome to visit Tunisia, and I have no doubt that he will totally change his mind.
      This comment is from an Arab Tunisian Muslim who embraces all who preach brotherhood and kindness to one another.
      Shalom, Peace, Salam.

      • Sam /

        Well said, Afif! The voice of reason.

        When I read this story I was quite upset but then I noted that the author says “Almost 100 people attended”. There are small minorities with irrational views in all societies but, given the opportunities created by the revolution, I wish members of ‘The National Committee for Supporting Arab Resistance and Fighting Normalization and Zionism’ could think of something more positive to spend their energies on!

      • Shimon Z. Klein /

        Afif,

        I appreciate your comment and thank you very much for it. I, like yourself, am convinced that the mainstream in Tunisia do think the same way as we do. Thew way of peace, dialogue and understanding. My dream as for Tunisians to come and visit Israel and I would be happy to host those who wish to discover more about this country. I believe that we must all strive to end the the occupation of Palestine. Any solution that has the will of both Israelis and Palestinians is acceptable. True freedom of religion, no racism and justice for all. These are values that we can all accept as it is in the interests of all peoples whose home is in the Middle East. We must give support to the people of Syria and Iran who are fighting to get rid of their dictatorships and the terrible bloodshed they are causing to their people. Peace, Shalom and Salaam to all.

    5. Arad /

      As an Israeli, I’m actually encouraged by this story. If all these anti-Semites could muster is a hundred people, it is insignificant. You’ll find a 100 anti-Semites in any country, including Israel. Of course, we’ll have to keep an eye and see if it grows.

      I do not expect Tunisians to love us, or even recognize Israel. There are issues that need to be solved first. But I do want to see Tunisia becoming a democracy, and I think it is also in the interest of my country. Antisemitic movements are poison to democracy, so let’s hope they remain small in Tunisia.

    6. SUR /

      I am a Tunisian Jew- No doubt the Tunisian people is 110% behind the Palestinians & this is just natural. Most of the population will not call Israël by its name but by the euphemism ” The zionist entity” & this is a pity.They forget it is a member of the OECD, club of the 30 most advanced countries in the world & I say that while being not a Zionist at all but a true Tunisian patriot who looks at Israël with sympathy but no Zionist spirit).I can tell you that in Tunisia, thoise who consider the Jews as the ennemies of the Arabs, are a minority.The fact that this event was attended by only 100 people speaks by itself. However, if the CPR + Ettakatol+ Ennahdha(governing coalition) decide that Tunisia will not “normalize” even if the Palestinian people do(& they will one day), that will be a counter revolutionary move & a bad sign as far as the Tunisian democracy is concerned, as it will create a thought crime in a country where the revolution was made by people who wanted true freedom of speech & of thinking.I’d love to see some answers to my note by my Muslim compatriots.

      • Afif /

        @SUR,
        I am sure that Tunisia will quickly normalize its relationship with Israel as soon as the Palestians and the Isrealis conclude a final settlement of their differences. Why not? Well…Tunisia may ask for a fair and full compensation to the victims of the Isreali raid on Tunis in the 1980′s, which would be the right thing to do. Extremists usually spoil amicable resolutions, but we all know who they are on both sides. Have a great day! (Tunisian Muslim).

    7. Shimon Z. Klein /

      That seems reasonable but I am not sure whether Israel would accept that as it is jumping the gun a bit. I do believe that serious negotiations which brings progress towards a genuine peace where all the cards are laid on the negotiating table with honesty and truth will go a far way to get results. Meanwhile i do believe that it is the people that should lead their governments on both sides in order to reach a solution. The problem is that the governments are making policies that do not reflect the will of the people and this is a severe problem.

      • Afif /

        Mr. Klein,
        There are many parties and factions who are interested in perpetuating the conflict between the Palestinians and the Israelis, including arms dealers, traders on the west bank, foreign powers who talk out of both sides of their mouths, and the list can go on and on. This is further complicated by internal political issues that both sides have, whether it is elections or internal struggles over control of power. However, no one ever thought at one point that certain things will happen in the world, but they did. I cite by way of example the Civil Rights Act of 1964 in the U.S., the abolition of apartheid in South Africa, the Tunisian Revolution and the Arab Spring. Each one of these started with one or a handful of individuals saying “no” to injustice and wrongs. It is incumbent upon each one of us to start with the education of our children, family members, friends, and strangers, because the goverments will never do it. The people are always ahead of their goverments. I asked my sister once. “Do you think the Israeli children have grandparents just like ours who love them and tickle them just like our own grandparents did? Do you think they suffer when their grandchilden are hurt?” This got her to place herself in the shoes of the other side, and she concluded that both sides have suffered enough and that the best solution is to stop the hurt now and to come up with a settlement. A settlement may not make both sides happy, but that is usually the best settlement—neither party is totally satisfied with the outcome, but the prize is peace. In any case, we need to educate those around us that we must treat others the way we want to be treated–a universal concept that all religions preach. Have a good day!

    8. Ahmed /

      a “cesspit” dug by you and the likes of people (most importantly governments) who support dictators out of bigotry and lust for money and furthering their own agendas so i say this its only 100 people why don’t you see antisemitism in Europe and the USA by their standards we are by no means a racist country in fact throughout the history of the conflict Tunisia was the voice of reason calling for the recognition of Israel and peace agreements and on a final note we weren’t given anything we demanded freedom and died for it we ripped it out of the clutches of a ruthless dictator supported by those who wish us to follow the what they believe is most suitable for us while in fact its what suits them
      Salam

    Tweets

    Popular posts


    Videos

    ...

  • Play Video

  • Play Video

  • Play Video


  • Posts

    In Pictures

    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live

  • Opinions