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    Gates of Tunisia’s Old Medina Open to the World Online

    By Sana Ajmi | Mar 23 2012 Share on Linkedin Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on pinterest Print

    Tags: Aghlabid , ALECSO , Aleppo , algiers , Andalusian ,

    Zitouna Mosque in the Old Medina of Tunis

    Visiting Tunisia’s old Medina – the historical district of the Tunis – online is now possible through the web site, medinatunis.com. Palaces, residences, mosques, and many other historical treasures are featured on the site, which will take you into every nook and cranny of one of the most beautiful medinas in the Arab world. These virtual tours will make visitors feel as though they are really there.

    The idea was conceived by the Arab League of Education, Culture, and Sciences (ALECSO), and the project aims to make old Arab cities known to the world and encourage cultural tourism.

    Through the virtual tour, visitors can experience all the different sites within Tunis’ Medina, including its multiple mosques, souks, cafes, and restaurants. You can also discover the unique architecture of the city, influenced by Hafsid, Aghlabid, Andalusian, Roman, Byzantinian, and Arab civilizations.

    The project only covers Tunis, but will expand to other Arab cities, such as Jerusalem, Cairo, Damascus, Muscat, Aleppo, Sanaa and Algiers.

    According to the communication manager of ALECSO, the idea was first developed during a conference, entitled, “Protection of Heritage and Relics,” in Algeria, and was received with resounding approval. ”Our aim is to develop cultural tourism. Instead of just going to the beach or visiting the desert, tourists can also learn about the culture of each city and discover the history,” he added.

    According to the same source, the project is also meant to serve as a resource for tourists researching prospective locations for their upcoming vacations. “80% of tourists all over the world consult the internet before visiting a place. So the website is really beneficial for tourists coming from the “Western” world, Asia, or the Arab world,” he asserted.

    ALECSO is an intergovernmental agency comprised of twenty-two member states, and its headquarters are located in Tunis. It facilitates the development and coordination of activities related to education, culture, and science in the Arab world, and also aims at developing international cooperation in these areas.

  • By Sana Ajmi  / 
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      Linda Scott /

      I spend half of my year in Bab Souika, when not there I am here pro.
      moting Tunisia, i am also writing a book about my life in Tunis. This site is good and helpful to anyone who plans to visit. I agree that culture shouls be part of a tourists itinery. Tunis is a wonderful city, even with it’s problems, and Tunisia is abeautiful country and proud to call it home

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    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
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      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live

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