• Headlines
    • Le Temps: ISIE Extends Voter Registration to August 31.. Yes, But What Is to Be Done about Irregularities?
    • La Presse: Minister of Foreign Affairs: Libya-Tunisia Borders May be Closed
    • Alchourouk: With Participation of 14,000 Soldiers Algerian-Tunisian Military Operations Against Terrorist Groups

    Court Rejects Zitouna Mosque’s Claim to Cultural Space in Tunis Medina

    By Amira Masrour | Jan 22 2013 Share on Linkedin Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on pinterest Print

    Tags: Association of International Studies , Houcine Laabidi , Khaldounia , third-national-featured , Zitouna

    Zitouna Mosque, Tunis

    The Court of First Instance in Tunis decided yesterday, January 21, to allow the Association of International Studies to resume its activities in the cultural space of Khaldounia, stated Fathi El Khemiri, an attorney involved in the case.

    The decision by the court did not please the imams of Zitouna mosque among whom is Houcine Laabidi, who broke into Khaldounia over two weeks ago and expelled those present before changing the locks of the building that he declared property of Zitouna.

    In an interview with Tunisia Live, Laabidi asserted that Khaldounia is a space to be used to educate people according to Zitouna’s doctrines and not dedicated to propagate political issues.

    “The fact of allowing associations to work in Khaldounia is allowing the space to become a political space instead of an educational one,” argued Laabidi.

    The imam stated his belief that Zitouna is targeted by foreign influences that seek to erradicate the Islamic identity of the country so that Muslims remain in a state of subordination to the Western world.

    “The Zitouna way of education is targeted because it represents a threat to foreign agendas,” said Laabidi without specifying which ones exactly.

    The court’s decision followed Laabidi’s accusation made against Fathi Guesmi, president of the Association of International Studies, of stealing over 7,000 books.

    The Zitouna mosque used to own property outside the mosque itself. However, since independence from French colonialism in 1956, all such properties were regarded as state belongings and entrusted to the Ministry of Religious Affairs. Following the January 14 revolution, the question of ownership over such real estate emerged to the surface again.

  • By Amira Masrour  / 
  • Topics

    People

    Place

    Organization

    Related

    Comments

    Tweets

    Popular posts


    Videos

    Silent March In Memory of Aya

    ...

  • Play Video

    Tunisia's Launch of Truth and Dignity Commission

  • Play Video

    Tunisialive Living Tunisia

  • Play Video

    #FreeAzyz campaigners protest gets violent


  • Posts

    In Pictures

    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live

  • Opinions