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    New 5 Dinar Bill Replaces Last Ben Ali Banknote

    By Tristan Dreisbach | Mar 21 2014 Share on Linkedin Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google Share on pinterest Print

    New five dinar banknote design. Image courtesy: Tunisia Central Bank

    New five dinar banknote design. Image courtesy: Tunisia Central Bank

    A new five dinar bill was introduced this week in Tunisia, replacing the last vestige of Ben Ali-era propaganda on the country’s currency.

    The new banknote is bright green and embraces Tunisia’s Carthaginian past, with an image of Hannibal on the front and depictions of Carthaginian ships on the reverse side. The ancient empire of Carthage was based near the modern capital city of Tunis.

    The bill will replace the old five dinar banknotes, which featured a different image of Hannibal on the front and a depiction of the date Bel Ali took power, November 7, 1987, on the back. This imagery was a feature on all Ben Ali-era banknotes. Since the revolution, the 50, 20, and 10 dinar bills have been replaced with new designs.

    The new bill has security features, including holograms and microprinting, not found on pre-revolutionary currency, according to a press release from the central bank.

    A five-dinar coin is also in circulation in Tunisia.

    The decision to remove the Ben Ali notes from circulation was made in February 2011, shortly after the autocrat was forced from office. The new bills are manufactured in facilities abroad.

    New five dinar banknote. Image courtesy: Tunisia Central Bank

    New five dinar banknote. Image courtesy: Tunisia Central Bank

    Pro-Ben Ali imagery on pre-revolution five dinar banknote. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

    Pro-Ben Ali imagery on pre-revolution five dinar banknote. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

  • By Tristan Dreisbach  / Editor
  • Tristan Dreisbach is Tunisia Live's editor. He previously worked on peacebuilding and statebuilding issues at the NYU Center on International Cooperation. He writes on politics, economics, and culture. He speaks English and German, and is studying Arabic. Tristan received an MA in Politics from New York University and a BA from the University of Michigan.

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    1. SeifJ /

      Why a predominantly modern Arab nation would place Hannibal Barca, a non-Muslim with Phoenician ancestry (debated as to exact heritage as his birth mother is unknown, but nevertheless a non-Arab) on the proposed issue of the 5 dinar note is puzzling. Tunisia is missing a prime opportunity to honor any number of modern era figures that would be more appropriate. Xenophobes and non-secular extremists, please exercise self-restraint… This comment is coming from a historical perspective.

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    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live
    • Carthage Theater Days statue display in downtown Tunis.

      Photo credit: Tristan Dreisbach, Tunisia Live

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