Category: Ancient Tunisia

Blog: Zaghouan, Where the Aqueduct Begins

Blog: Zaghouan, Where the Aqueduct Begins

| 24 May 2013 | 3 Comments

While higher-profile coastal town like Sousse, Hammamet, and Carthage may dominate your Tunisia guidebook, it is quite often the less-traveled, out of the way spots that provide the most satisfying and rewarding experiences in this diverse and scenic country. After nearly three months in which I never left the confines of metropolitan Tunis, I joined a [...]

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Unearthing the Catacombs of Sousse

Unearthing the Catacombs of Sousse

| 07 April 2012 | 0 Comments

From the first century AD, Christians were considered a threat to the unity of Rome and were oppressed and persecuted by Roman authorities for more than four hundred years across the empire. In fact, they were not even allowed to bury their dead in ordinary cemeteries. Thus, they resorted to “catacombs,” which were underground passageways [...]

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The Other Face of Kairouan

The Other Face of Kairouan

| 30 March 2012 | 1 Comment

Kairouan is the fifth-biggest city in Tunisia with more than 150,000 inhabitants. It’s 155 km south of Tunis and 65 km west of the Sahel – Tunisia’s eastern coast. The Arabs founded the city in the 7th century and made it into a military base during their conquest of the Maghreb and Spain. Later it became [...]

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Zaghouan, Home of Rich Cultural Heritage and Eco-Tourism

Zaghouan, Home of Rich Cultural Heritage and Eco-Tourism

| 04 March 2012 | 2 Comments

Zaghouan is a Tunisian city that lies in northeast Tunisia, 55 kilometers south of the capital city Tunis. As of 2004, Zaghouan had a population of 34,367 inhabitants. It lies below the 1,295 meter-Djebel Zaghouan and dominates a vast agricultural plain.  It is also the capital of the district of Zaghouan. The Romans once called [...]

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